Monthly Archives: May 2019

Environmentally-Friendly Water-Fueled Motor Vehicles

     Please forward the following links.

     Water/H2O is an actual fuel source. This is accomplished using standard electrolysis, granted with considerably increased energy efficiency & production when the electrolysis is done at the resonance frequency of water molecules vibration.

Water/H2O becomes—>H+OH-, flammable energy; compatible with internal combustion engines & additional existing infrastructure/power plants, ships, boilers, etc. This clean burning high yield energy produces no pollution. The exhaust from the cyclic process=H2O/Water vapor—> that could be recondensed for recycled fuel, and/or too supply/create purified fresh water reservoirs (if the process was done at larger power plant size!).

 

References: Truth News & HHO/Brown Gas

Water-Powered Car System Explained:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGVpr_Hk0iI

 

How to Build and Run Vehicles on Water:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=na1Z5dus2LQ

 

Series of You Tube Videos Demonstrating the HHO/Brown Gas Technology:

https://youtu.be/ImGaraPrEo8

Be advised:

This process was initially discovered at U.S. national laboratories; See Stan Meyers@waterpoweredvehicle utilizing that vibe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=staL1wr07Sg.

sports_car_front_grill

This technology is legitimate, practical, & life-saving. A low cost unlimited energy, both environmentally friendly & economically booming – against the rising expenses of transport & energy in general too private/individual, business/industries, & governments around the world.

Truthfully, it would involve a paradigm shift from trickle-down economics & concentration of power, towards a more circular flow of wealth & resources. Even so incremental changes should’ve began already, in order too avoid the severe escalations of consequences for environments & associated economies. If this HHO/Brown gas technology were too become standardized like it could be, there would also probably be significant policy changes that must accompany it.

For example, We The People would have to become accepting of additional highway tolls & tags taxes, to replace the lost funding of some government services currently paid for at gas pumps by the public. The details must be worked out, or circumstances will probably force such an outcome eventually, although perhaps then much more haphazardly?! Weather or not climate change genuinely motivates energy/economic policy changes, there will inevitably be big losers sooner or later. That reality could be mitigated too some extent if HHO/Brown gas ever happens institutionally, and some foresight hear could make money for the wiser while also preventing much grief.

Whether or not however you might feel and/or think in regards towards environmental & economic concerns, the disaster response/preparedness & military/national security benefits of refining this technology for quick roll out should be undeniably obvious?!

Another great idea: All hospital backup generators should be HHO/Brown gas, or at least some hybrid version of it?!

Generally speaking, if you should really like to help to stop global war’ming, then please forward links of this very reasonable & legitimate solution too many environmental protection and energy issues.

 

 Note: credits due to Myster Rainman (lightknight 121@hotmail.com)

 

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Alabama is a Sad Example that Respect for Human Life Does Not Extend Beyond the Womb

 

By the way,

Alabama has the fourth worst infant mortality rate in the country.
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb. (Credit: Getty Images)
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb. (Credit: Getty Images)

After signing the country’s strictest abortion ban into law Wednesday, Alabama Gov.

Kay Ivey (R) explained her reasoning in a statement, citing “Alabamians’ deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God.”

But that belief is not reflected in the state’s abysmal statistics when it comes to child mortality, child poverty, food insecurity, education, child care, or paid family leave. Indeed, Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb.

Under Alabama’s total abortion ban, providers could face jail time of 10 to 99 years for providing abortions. Patients are exempt from criminal and civil charges. The only exception is if the health of the pregnant person is at serious risk. There are no exceptions for rape or incest. The law will go into effect in 2020, but is expected to be met with lawsuits before then

But the Alabama legislature has done little to tackle this problem, choosing instead to focus primarily on “fringe issues and oddball causes that don’t improve Alabamians’ lives and health,” the editorial board of a local newspaper wrote in 2018.

The same holds true of the state’s child poverty rate. A 2018 report by VOICES for Alabama Children found that there were more children living in poverty in 2018 than in 2000. About 26.5% of children in Alabama live in poverty, including about 30% of children under the age of 5.

Alabama is also one of the most food insecure states in the country, with more than 16% of the population struggling to afford food. This means that more than one in five children grow up hungry. The problem, as Hunger Free America CEO Joel Berg explained to Alabama Today, has much to do with the state’s lack of a minimum wage, instead abiding by the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

“It’s no surprise that we again found that states with higher minimum wages have less hunger among working people and states with lower minimum wages had more hunger among working people,” he said.

Exacerbating the situation are recent drops in food stamp recipients, thanks to the expiration of a federal waiver that allowed Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to be exempt from work requirements. Now, all able-bodied SNAP recipients between the ages of 18 and 49 who aren’t raising children must have at least a part-time job to qualify for benefits. Last year, 38,000 Alabamians lost eligibility to food stamps.

education. The state’s per pupil funding of $9,497 is significantly lower than the national average of about $11,400. Similarly, Alabama has done little to enact regulations for childcare services, allowing hundreds of child care centers to claim a religious exemption from licensing, even as child injuries and deaths at unlicensed centers have garnered attention over the past few years.

The average family in Alabama has a tough time affording child care, as the cost of taking care of one infant demands 11% of a family’s income. Research by the Economic Policy Institute found that this cost is “out of reach for low-wage workers.”

Making matters worse, Alabama does not have a statewide paid family leave policy. According to the National Partnership for Women and Families, “This means Alabamians face impossible choices when new children are born or adopted and when serious personal or family health needs inevitably arise.”