Category Archives: Socioeconomics

Needed U. S. Gun Policy [with Justice Stevens op-ed, written ’18] included with The Dailey Sun~Chronicles Volume VII, Issue 31, Fall 2018

via Needed U. S. Gun Policy [with Justice Stevens op-ed, written ’18] included with The Dailey Sun~Chronicles Volume VII, Issue 31, Fall 2018

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U. S. Gun Policy [with Justice Stevens op-ed, written ’18] included with The Dailey Sun~Chronicles Volume VII, Issue 31, Fall 2018

Refer to these articles…

via U. S. Gun Policy [with Justice Stevens op-ed, written ’18] included with The Dailey Sun~Chronicles Volume VII, Issue 31, Fall 2018

Addendum:

August 2019

If the President did the right thing:

  1. He would have apologized for his racist language
  2.  He would have called Congress (today) for a special session on Gun Controls and Impeachment proceedings
  3. Trump would stop lying

Getting Wiser by Getting Older ~ Wisdom & Wellness

The Dailey Sun~Chronicles

 

Volume VIII, Issue 80                      July 29, 2019                          ***** Edition

 

Dateline: Anywhere

 

Become Content

  1. Stop Complaining
  2. Change Your Perspective
  3. Be Thankful
  4. Don’t Compare Thyself to Others
  5. Lower Your Expectations
  6. Put People Before Things
  7. Do Away with Wish-lists
  8. Focus on Today
  9. Savor the Little Things
  10. Eliminate Excess

 

Practice Affirmations

positive words

 

Good Time Management: Avoid the unnecessary, inefficient, fear, indecisiveness, trivial tasks, distractions, disorganization, perfectionism; repeating, pleasing everyone, lack of rest, poor health habits, unmotivation, and holding onto the past.

 

Handling and Recognizing Emotions Well (sophisticated wisdom reaction)
emotions

 

Develop a High Emotional Intelligence:

high emotional intelligence

 

Recognizing Triggers that Lead to Negative Consequences (wisdom reaction)

 

Practicing Mindfulness

  • A mindful attitude is non-judgmental, patient, non-striving, and ablity to let-go.
  • One can do mindful eating, too. Concentrate on the sensations, selecting nutritious foods, and enjoying all.
  • Mindful breathing means getting comfortable, observing each breath, and being non-critical.
  • Mindful walking involves being aware of surroundings and keeping rhythm.

mindfullness

 

Becoming More Resilient (Reduce Stress)

  1. Experience More Positive Emotions
  2. Express Gratitude
  3. Hand-on Serenity Exercises
  4. Move-on to Positive Emotions
  5. Practice One Scary Thing Per Day

resilience

Get Mentally Tough

I like #3 a lot!
mental toughness

 

Utilize Breathing Exercises (Mindfulness Methods)

breathing

 

Use Coping Strategies

coping strategies

 

Adopt Any of 12 Things Happy People Do

  • Express Gratitude
  • Cultivate Optimism
  • Learn to Forgive
  • Avoid Overthinking and Social Comparison
  • Practice Acts of Kindness
  • Nurture Social Relationships
  • Increase Focus Experiences
  • Develop Strategies for Coping
  • Savor Life’s Joys
  • Commit to Your Goals
  • Take Care of Your Body
  • Practice Spirituality

 

Reframe Thoughts into Happiness

positive

 

 

Turn Personal Weaknesses into Strengths

Inconsistent >>> Flexible

Disorganized >>> Creative

Obnoxious >>> Enthusiastic

Stubborn >>> Dedicated

Emotionless >>> Calm

Shy >>> Reflective

Weak >>> Humble

Indecisive >>> Patient

Impatient >>> Passionate

Arrogant >> Self-Confident

Intimidating >>> Assertive

 

Act When You Are Feeling Down (Sad, Disappointed, or Depressed)

  • Be Spiritual
  • Be Sociable
  • Move and Exercise
  • Nurture Yourself: Eat, Shower, Read, Dress Up, Get Creative,
  • Engage Your Brain
  • Do Things that Make You Happier
  • Accept Medical Help

 

Practice a Well-Designed Life

The Eight Dimensions of Wellness:

  1. Physical
  2. Psychological
  3. Spiritual
  4. Intellectual
  5. Financial
  6. Occupational
  7. Environmental
  8. Social

 

Do Healthy Anti-Aging Things:

Try Retinoids, Alpha-Hydroxy Acids, Hyalukonic Acids, Anti-Oxydants, Peptides, Deramides, DNA-Repair Ingredients, and Lighteners

anti aging

 

 

Silence Negative Thinking

stop neg thoughts

 

Discard Distorted Conceptions and Bias

untwist thoughts

 

Eliminate Things That Block Happiness

blocking happiness

 

Move Beyond Your “Comfort Zone” and Learn: Deal with challenges and problems. Achieve new skills, and expand “Comfort Zone.”

 

Have a Growth Rather Than a Fixed Mindset

growth mindset

 

Improve Memory

(i.e. Writing things down, Chunking data, Little and often, Make it a story, Create acronyms, Say things out-loud, Create silly sentences, Practice, Focus, Test yourself, Ask why, Get enough sleep and water)

better memory

 

Practice Healthy Habits of Highly Productive People

effective

 

Distress Tolerance Skill Development

distress

dbt-distress-tolerance-skills

 

Be Creative

creativ

creative

Manage Anxiety

anxiety

anxiety

 

Relieve Stress

 

 

Just Say “No”

 

Letting Go

letting go

 

Develop Good Habits of the Mind

  1. Perseverance: Focus, Complete Tasks, Remove Goal Obstructions.
  2. Empathetic Listening
  3. Manage Impulsivity: Remain Calm, Thoughtful, and Deliberate.
  4. Flexibility
  5. Metacognition: Aware of thoughts, strategies, feelings, and effects on others.
  6. Striving for Accuracy: Setting high standards, checking, and finding ways to improve.
  7. Questioning and Problem Solving
  8. Applying Old Knowledge to New Situations
  9. Communicating Clearly with accuracy and thought.
  10. Gather Data through various sources
  11. Creating, Imagining, and Innovation.
  12. Responding with Wonderment and Awesomeness: Having fun, being intrigued, undaunted by phenomena.
  13. Taking Responsible Risks: Competent, Adventuresome, and using new things.
  14. Finding Humor.
  15. Thinking Independently.
  16. Remaining Open.

 

Deal with Confrontation Well:

confrontation

 

Observe Good Nutrition

  1. Intake
  2. Avoid foods that may induce dementia: White Foods (sugar, bread, rice, etc), Processed Food (meats, cheese), Foods containing Nitrites or Diacetyls (margarine, beer)

 

Flex Muscles of Spiritual Fitness

spiritual

 

Watch Your Language and Speak Positive

positive

 

Learn Effectively

eg. Incident Prevention: Understand Cause and Effect; Identify Root Causes: Apply Skills and Knowledge; Get the Big Picture; Cooperate with Others; Set Goals; Build a Working Memory; Deliberate Practice; Chunking Large Bits of Data; Explain Training Techniques; Improve Memory; Repetition; Self-Test; Adapt to Unusual Situations; Build Safe Habits; Drive (enough sleep, food) Healthy; Learn from and teach others; Humble Self-Confidence; Apply wisdom daily; Relax and Reduce Anxiety; Prioritize Tasks; Self-Controlled Behavior;

 

Practice Sensory Calming Techniques
sensory calming

 

 

. . . and Develop Your Sense of Humor

 

 

Copyright MMXIX – Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas

94062-2448 // DaileySun@outlook.com

~ for musement only ~

Juneteenth Anniversary for Human Rights

Modern society is still faced with human trafficking, fair wage discussions,

union activities, and issues of human rights equality under the law.

 

The Dailey Sun~Chronicles – “No Rumors, No Fakes – Just the Facts, Jack!”

 

Volume VIII, Issue 43                                  6 – 19 – 2019                           ***** Edition

 

“Annual Observance of Juneteenth”

Juneteenth – the formal end of slavery (by law, on paper) throughout the United States in the mid-19th Century – is an observance all mankind should take heed.

juneteenth

The following was taken from Wikipedia:

During the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, with an effective date of January 1, 1863. It declared that all enslaved persons in the Confederate States of America in rebellion and not in Union hands were to be freed. This excluded the five states known later as border states, which were the four “slave states” not in rebellion – Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri – and those counties of Virginia soon to form the state of West Virginia, and also the three zones under Union occupation: the state of Tennessee, lower Louisiana, and Southeast Virginia.

More isolated geographically, Texas was not a battleground, and thus the people held there as slaves were not affected by the Emancipation Proclamation unless they escaped.[7] Planters and other slaveholders had migrated into Texas from eastern states to escape the fighting, and many brought enslaved people with them, increasing by the thousands the enslaved population in the state at the end of the Civil War.[8] Although most enslaved people lived in rural areas, more than 1,000 resided in both Galveston and Houston by 1860, with several hundred in other large towns.[9] By 1865, there were an estimated 250,000 enslaved people in Texas.[8]

The news of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender on April 9 reached Texas later in the month.[10] The Army of the Trans-Mississippi did not surrender until June 2.[8] On June 18, Union Army General Gordon Granger arrived at Galveston Island with 2,000 federal troops to occupy Texas on behalf of the federal government.[7] The following day, standing on the balcony of Galveston’s Ashton Villa, Granger read aloud the contents of “General Order No. 3”, announcing the total emancipation of those held as slaves:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.[11]

Emancipation Day celebration in Richmond, Virginia in 1905 – the 50th anniversary

Formerly enslaved people in Galveston rejoiced in the streets after the announcement, although in the years afterward many struggled to work through the changes against resistance of whites. The following year, freedmen organized the first of what became the annual celebration of Juneteenth in Texas.[11] In some cities African-Americans were barred from using public parks because of state-sponsored segregation of facilities. Across parts of Texas, freed people pooled their funds to purchase land to hold their celebrations, such as Houston‘s Emancipation Park, Mexia‘s Booker T. Washington Park, and Emancipation Park in Austin.[8][11]

Although the date is sometimes referred to as the “traditional end of slavery in Texas” it was given legal status in a series of Texas Supreme Court decisions between 1868 and 1874.[12]

In the early 20th century, economic and political forces led to a decline in Juneteenth celebrations. From 1890 to 1908, Texas and all former Confederate states passed new constitutions or amendments that effectively disenfranchised black people, excluding them from the political process. White-dominated state legislatures passed Jim Crow laws imposing second-class status. The Great Depression forced many black people off farms and into the cities to find work. In these urban environments, African Americans had difficulty taking the day off to celebrate. The Second Great Migration began during World War II, when many black people migrated to the West Coast where skilled jobs in the defense industry were opening up.[13] From 1940 through 1970, in the second wave of the Great Migration, more than 5 million black people left Texas, Louisiana and other parts of the South for the North and West Coast. As historian Isabel Wilkerson writes, “The people from Texas took Juneteenth Day to Los Angeles, Oakland, Seattle, and other places they went.”[14]

By the 1950s and 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement focused the attention of African-American youth on the struggle for racial equality and the future, but many linked these struggles to the historical struggles of their ancestors. Following the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign to Washington, DC called by Rev. Ralph Abernathy, many attendees returned home and initiated Juneteenth celebrations in areas where the day was not previously celebrated.

Since the 1980s and 1990s, the holiday has been more widely celebrated among African-American communities. In 1994 a group of community leaders gathered at Christian Unity Baptist Church in New Orleans, Louisiana to work for greater national celebration of Juneteenth.[15] Expatriates have celebrated it in cities abroad, such as Paris.[16] Some US military bases in other countries sponsor celebrations, in addition to those of private groups.[16][17]

Although the holiday is still mostly unknown outside African-American communities, it has gained mainstream awareness through depictions in entertainment media, such as episodes of TV series Atlanta (2016)[18] and Black-ish (2017),[19] the latter of which featured musical numbers about the holiday by Aloe Blacc, The Roots,[20] and Fonzworth Bentley.[21][22]

 

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Footnotes:

  1. “Juneteenth Celebrated in Coachella”. Black Voice News. June 22, 2011. Archived from the original on January 22, 2012.
  2. “Juneteenth”. Merriam Webster Dictionary. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  3. “National Observance of Juneteenth is Still a Struggle”. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  4. Taylor, 2002. pp. 28–29.
  5. “How to Celebrate”. Juneteenth.com. Retrieved June 19, 2014.[self-published source]
  6. “Mascogos. Siempre listos para partir”. El Universal (in Spanish). September 19, 2016. Retrieved July 31, 2017. Sin embargo, la fiesta de la comunidad es el 19 de junio – el Juneteenth Day en Estados Unidos – el día que los esclavos de Galveston, Texas, supieron que eran libres.
  7. Cruz, Gilbert (June 18, 2008). “A Brief History of Juneteenth”. Time magazine. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  8. Gates, Henry Louis, Jr. “What Is Juneteenth?”. The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross. PBS. Originally posted on The Root. Retrieved September 30, 2014.
  9. Barr (1996), p. 24.
  10. The Texas Republican (Marshall), April 28, 1865, p. 2, contains a reference to the surrender
  11. “Juneteenth”. Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Retrieved July 6, 2006.
  12. Campbell, Randolph (1984). “The End of Slavery in Texas: A Research Note”. Southwestern Historical Quarterly. 88 (1): 71–80.
  13. Adams, Luther (November 29, 2010). Way Up North in Louisville: African American Migration in the Urban South, 1930–1970. University of North Carolina Press. ISBN978-0807899434.
  14. Wilkerson, Isabel (2010). The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration. New York: Random House. Retrieved June 19, 2015.
  15. Chandler, D.L. (June 19, 2012). “Juneteenth: Celebrating The Early Moments Of Freedom Today”. News One. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  16. Moskin, Julie (June 18, 2004). “An Obscure Texas Celebration Makes Its Way Across the U.S.” The New York Times. Retrieved April 28, 2011.
  17. “The World Celebrates Freedom”. Juneteenth.com. Retrieved June 19, 2006.
  18. Ho, Rodney (October 25, 2016). “FX’s ‘Atlanta’ recap (‘Juneteenth’): season 1, episode 9”. Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  19. Framke, Caroline (October 4, 2017). “Black-ish’s musical episode about Juneteenth is a pointed lesson on American ignorance”. Vox. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  20. “I Am A Slave”. YouTube. ABC News. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  21. “We Built This”. YouTube. ABC Television Network. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  22. Butler, Berhonie (October 4, 2017). “‘Blackish’ gives a powerful history lesson – with nods to ‘Hamilton’ and ‘Schoolhouse Rock'”. Washington Post. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  23. Dingus, Anne (June 2001). “Once a Texas-only holiday marking the end of slavery, Juneteenth is now celebrated nationwide with high spirits and hot barbecue”. Texas Monthly. Retrieved October 11, 2013.

 

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 – Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas, LLC –

from Woodside, California 94062-2448

“The Dailey Sun~Chronicles”

 

Environmentally-Friendly Water-Fueled Motor Vehicles

     Please forward the following links.

     Water/H2O is an actual fuel source. This is accomplished using standard electrolysis, granted with considerably increased energy efficiency & production when the electrolysis is done at the resonance frequency of water molecules vibration.

Water/H2O becomes—>H+OH-, flammable energy; compatible with internal combustion engines & additional existing infrastructure/power plants, ships, boilers, etc. This clean burning high yield energy produces no pollution. The exhaust from the cyclic process=H2O/Water vapor—> that could be recondensed for recycled fuel, and/or too supply/create purified fresh water reservoirs (if the process was done at larger power plant size!).

 

References: Truth News & HHO/Brown Gas

Water-Powered Car System Explained:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGVpr_Hk0iI

 

How to Build and Run Vehicles on Water:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=na1Z5dus2LQ

 

Series of You Tube Videos Demonstrating the HHO/Brown Gas Technology:

https://youtu.be/ImGaraPrEo8

Be advised:

This process was initially discovered at U.S. national laboratories; See Stan Meyers@waterpoweredvehicle utilizing that vibe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=staL1wr07Sg.

sports_car_front_grill

This technology is legitimate, practical, & life-saving. A low cost unlimited energy, both environmentally friendly & economically booming – against the rising expenses of transport & energy in general too private/individual, business/industries, & governments around the world.

Truthfully, it would involve a paradigm shift from trickle-down economics & concentration of power, towards a more circular flow of wealth & resources. Even so incremental changes should’ve began already, in order too avoid the severe escalations of consequences for environments & associated economies. If this HHO/Brown gas technology were too become standardized like it could be, there would also probably be significant policy changes that must accompany it.

For example, We The People would have to become accepting of additional highway tolls & tags taxes, to replace the lost funding of some government services currently paid for at gas pumps by the public. The details must be worked out, or circumstances will probably force such an outcome eventually, although perhaps then much more haphazardly?! Weather or not climate change genuinely motivates energy/economic policy changes, there will inevitably be big losers sooner or later. That reality could be mitigated too some extent if HHO/Brown gas ever happens institutionally, and some foresight hear could make money for the wiser while also preventing much grief.

Whether or not however you might feel and/or think in regards towards environmental & economic concerns, the disaster response/preparedness & military/national security benefits of refining this technology for quick roll out should be undeniably obvious?!

Another great idea: All hospital backup generators should be HHO/Brown gas, or at least some hybrid version of it?!

Generally speaking, if you should really like to help to stop global war’ming, then please forward links of this very reasonable & legitimate solution too many environmental protection and energy issues.

 

 Note: credits due to Myster Rainman (lightknight 121@hotmail.com)

 

Alabama is a Sad Example that Respect for Human Life Does Not Extend Beyond the Womb

 

By the way,

Alabama has the fourth worst infant mortality rate in the country.
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb. (Credit: Getty Images)
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb. (Credit: Getty Images)

After signing the country’s strictest abortion ban into law Wednesday, Alabama Gov.

Kay Ivey (R) explained her reasoning in a statement, citing “Alabamians’ deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God.”

But that belief is not reflected in the state’s abysmal statistics when it comes to child mortality, child poverty, food insecurity, education, child care, or paid family leave. Indeed, Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb.

Under Alabama’s total abortion ban, providers could face jail time of 10 to 99 years for providing abortions. Patients are exempt from criminal and civil charges. The only exception is if the health of the pregnant person is at serious risk. There are no exceptions for rape or incest. The law will go into effect in 2020, but is expected to be met with lawsuits before then

But the Alabama legislature has done little to tackle this problem, choosing instead to focus primarily on “fringe issues and oddball causes that don’t improve Alabamians’ lives and health,” the editorial board of a local newspaper wrote in 2018.

The same holds true of the state’s child poverty rate. A 2018 report by VOICES for Alabama Children found that there were more children living in poverty in 2018 than in 2000. About 26.5% of children in Alabama live in poverty, including about 30% of children under the age of 5.

Alabama is also one of the most food insecure states in the country, with more than 16% of the population struggling to afford food. This means that more than one in five children grow up hungry. The problem, as Hunger Free America CEO Joel Berg explained to Alabama Today, has much to do with the state’s lack of a minimum wage, instead abiding by the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

“It’s no surprise that we again found that states with higher minimum wages have less hunger among working people and states with lower minimum wages had more hunger among working people,” he said.

Exacerbating the situation are recent drops in food stamp recipients, thanks to the expiration of a federal waiver that allowed Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to be exempt from work requirements. Now, all able-bodied SNAP recipients between the ages of 18 and 49 who aren’t raising children must have at least a part-time job to qualify for benefits. Last year, 38,000 Alabamians lost eligibility to food stamps.

education. The state’s per pupil funding of $9,497 is significantly lower than the national average of about $11,400. Similarly, Alabama has done little to enact regulations for childcare services, allowing hundreds of child care centers to claim a religious exemption from licensing, even as child injuries and deaths at unlicensed centers have garnered attention over the past few years.

The average family in Alabama has a tough time affording child care, as the cost of taking care of one infant demands 11% of a family’s income. Research by the Economic Policy Institute found that this cost is “out of reach for low-wage workers.”

Making matters worse, Alabama does not have a statewide paid family leave policy. According to the National Partnership for Women and Families, “This means Alabamians face impossible choices when new children are born or adopted and when serious personal or family health needs inevitably arise.”

A BOOK OF ANGELS – – – ready for sale . . . first printing cost = $64.95 + shipping + tax (9% California) + handling

A BOOK OF ANGELS

over 160 pages

plus over 90 full-color illustrations of angels

 

 

RubensPeterPaulStStephen

Parody Edition: Jokes for 2029

The San Dailey Sun~Chronicles

Parody Edition

Headlines from the year 2029… *

 

  • Japanese scientists have created a camera with such a fast shutter speed, they now can photograph a woman with her mouth shut.

(hey! Settle down, I just repeated it.  I didn’t write it!)

 

  • Ozone created by electric cars is now killing millions in the seventh largest country in the world, “Mexifornia” formally known as California.  White minorities still trying to have English recognized as “Mexifornia’s” third language.

 

  • A Spotted Owl plague threatens northwestern United States crops and livestock.

 

  • One baby was conceived naturally, scientists are stumped.

 

  • Couple petitions court to reinstate heterosexual marriage.

 

  • The last remaining Fundamentalist Muslim dies in the American Territory of the Middle East (formerly known as Iran, Afghanistan, Syria and Lebanon).

 

  • The area of Iraq is still closed off; nuclear physicists estimate it will take at least 10 more years before radioactivity decays to safe levels.

 

  • France pleads for global help after being taken over by Jamaican Rastafarians.

 

  • Castro Jr. finally dies at age 112; Cuban cigars can now be imported legally, but President Chelsea Clinton has banned all smoking.

 

  • George Z. Bush, adopted son of Jeb Bush, says he will run for President in 2032.

 

  • The United States Postal Service raises the price of a first-class stamp to

$12.89 and reduces mail delivery to Wednesdays only.

 

  • Revealed in an 85-year, federally-funded $75.8 billion study: Diet and Exercise are the key to weight loss.

 

  • The average weight of Americans drops to 250 lbs.

 

  • The State of Massachusetts executes its last remaining conservative.

 

  • The Supreme Court rules punishment of criminals violates their civil rights.

 

  • Donald J. Trump receives another pardon from President Clinton.

 

  • The average height of NBA players is now eight feet, seven inches.

 

  • A new federal law requires that all nail clippers, screwdrivers, fly swatters and rolled-up newspapers must be registered by January 2036.

 

  • Congress authorizes direct deposit of formerly illegal political contributions to campaign accounts.

 

  • A Capitol Hill intern is indicted for refusing to have sex with a congressperson.

 

  • The IRS sets the lowest income tax rate at 55 percent.

 

  • Florida voters are still having trouble with voting machines.

 

george carlincomedian from heaven

=                  =                  =

 

* (Jokes originally written in 2005)

Time to Act – Help Generation Z Americans Manage Their Anxiety

Attempts to shield children from words, ideas, and people that might cause them emotional discomfort are bad for the students. They are bad for the workplace, which will be mired in unending litigation if student expectations of safety are carried forward. They are bad for American democracy, which is already paralyzed by worsening partisanship. When the ideas, values, and speech of the other side are seen not just as wrong but as willfully aggressive toward innocent victims, it is hard to imagine the kind of mutual respect, negotiation, and compromise that are needed to make politics a positive-sum game.

Rather than trying to protect students from words and ideas that they will inevitably encounter, colleges should do all they can to equip students to thrive in a world full of words and ideas that they cannot control.

Using Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques and effective medicines can be implemented to help Generation Z overcome their anxiety.

MEDICINE (#13) and COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY

A partial list from Robert L. Leahy, Stephen J. F. Holland, and Lata K. McGinn’s Treatment Plans and Interventions for Depression and Anxiety Disorders (2012).

  1. Mind reading. You assume that you know what people think without having sufficient evidence of their thoughts. “He thinks I’m a loser.”
  2. Fortune-telling. You predict the future negatively: things will get worse, or there is danger ahead. “I’ll fail that exam,” or “I won’t get the job.”
  3. Catastrophizing. You believe that what has happened or will happen will be so awful and unbearable that you won’t be able to stand it. “It would be terrible if I failed.”
  4. Labeling. You assign global negative traits to yourself and others. “I’m undesirable,” or “He’s a rotten person.”
  5. Discounting positives. You claim that the positive things you or others do are trivial. “That’s what wives are supposed to do—so it doesn’t count when she’s nice to me,” or “Those successes were easy, so they don’t matter.”
  6. Negative filtering. You focus almost exclusively on the negatives and seldom notice the positives. “Look at all of the people who don’t like me.”
  7. Overgeneralizing. You perceive a global pattern of negatives on the basis of a single incident. “This generally happens to me. I seem to fail at a lot of things.”
  8. Dichotomous thinking. You view events or people in all-or-nothing terms. “I get rejected by everyone,” or “It was a complete waste of time.”
  9. Blaming. You focus on the other person as the source of your negative feelings, and you refuse to take responsibility for changing yourself. “She’s to blame for the way I feel now,” or “My parents caused all my problems.”
  10. What if? You keep asking a series of questions about “what if” something happens, and you fail to be satisfied with any of the answers. “Yeah, but what if I get anxious?” or “What if I can’t catch my breath?”
  11. Emotional reasoning. You let your feelings guide your interpretation of reality. “I feel depressed; therefore, my marriage is not working out.sco
  12. Inability to disconfirm. You reject any evidence or arguments that might contradict your negative thoughts. For example, when you have the thought I’m unlovable, you reject as irrelevant any evidence that people like you.

 

antianxiety meds

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MAX’S SCOUT SERVICES & COMMUNICATIONS OF THE AMERICAS, LLC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategy as the Stock Market Heads Down – Making Moves in Anticipation of a ‘Stock Market Crash’

This week, the market has been demonstrating “corrections.”  It is time to implement ideas from Shark Tank’s Mister Wonderful Dennis O’Leary.

“Never cry when the market goes down, because it’s not crying for you,” he says. “You should never get emotional about the stock market.”

Here are O’Leary’s top three tips to survive the market’s ups and downs:

  1. Don’t panic

“The truth about markets is that they never go straight up,” O’Leary tells CNBC.

For the last few years, the market has been less volatile, he says, so young people “are not used to major corrections, and so now we’re starting to get them,” he says. “These are normal phenomena.”

You have to think long term.

“You’ll see the markets go up and down,” says O’Leary, “but over a long period of time — and this has been consistent since the beginning of stocks in America — they grow over time because the companies and the economy grows over time.” The S&P 500 index, for example, has earned an annual average return of 9.8 percent over the past 90 years.

“You want a piece of that for your future.”

  1. Buy for value

If you “buy companies that are profitable and that have good balance sheets that pay

dividends,” says O’Leary, “you can sustain yourself through these massive corrections.”

You can still do this, he says, “even if you only have $50 to invest or $100.”

O’Leary, who owns O’Shares ETFs, recommends exchange traded funds because they are inexpensive and tax efficient. These ETFs are buckets of securities that track an index.

Similarly, other experts, including O’Leary’s fellow Shark Mark Cuban and investor Warren Buffett, recommend index funds, which you can think of as low-risk, low-cost baskets of stocks.

You may also consider using an app that allows you to buy fractional shares, says O’Leary. His app, Beanstox, and others like Stockpile do this.

  1. Diversify

“You shouldn’t have all of your money invested in stocks — that’s too risky,” says O’Leary. “You also need some fixed-income like bonds.”

And “Keep some cash around,” he says. “You feel much better if you have cash, even though your portfolio may be [temporarily] down 20 percent.”

“Diversification is the only free lunch,” adds O’Leary.

George Washingtons

a warm coat for a cold winter