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Super Food for Both Sides of the Line of Scrimmage – Cook’s Strategy for Easily Made Help-Yourself Grub

     A host can satify all guests’ hunger during Indy’s SBXLVI game by preparing two pots before Sunday’s National Anthem. Let them serve themselves. Don’t be stuck in the kitchen missing plays, funny commercials, and Madonna’s halftime.

New England Clam Chowder and Giant Chili!

Giant Chili

     This recipe is better than anything you can find canned. Hot chili works well before going outside for a big activity or during a TV football game. Serve with raw vegetables, chips, dip, and maybe some cornbread on the side.

Poor Niners, One Game Shy of Being in the SuperBowl

     When you are next at the supermarket, make sure that you have the following in the house:

  • Two, four, or six pounds of ground beef or chuck (depending on how many hungry people you plan to feed) or even choose ground turkey
  • Sweet Maui or Walla Walla onions
  • Dark Red Kidney Beans
  • Garlic
  • Olive Oil
  • Peppers (Jalapeno, bell, Anaheim, green, powdered black and red) chosen depending on your preference for a hot, spicy, and maybe sweaty meal
  • Brown Sugar
  • Molasses
  • Salt
  • Cumin
  • Chili Powder
  • A beer or two
  • Red Wine (if you can find Two-Buck Chuck, that would be a great value) or not in order to get a full brewed hop flavor
  • Tomato Paste
  • Tomato Sauce
  • Fresh Tomatoes

     Start by sautéing the onions and garlic with a bit of olive oil. Add in the ground meat. Brown the mixture before transferring it to a large pot.

     Open up one or two cans of tomato sauce. You’ll need more sauce if sliced tomatoes are not going to be added. Select one can of paste for each large can of sauce. Cut up fresh tomatoes and add into the mix. Drain how many cans of beans you wish and add them. Throw in some molasses, peppers, spices, sugar, and decide whether to add beer or wine. In general, use 12 ounces of liquid for every two pounds of meat.

     Whatever you don’t add to the cooking, go ahead and drink it.

     After bringing the chili to a bubble, reduce the heat to a simmer. Cover and let the flavors meld for at least an hour.

     Then you are ready. Ladle it up into bowls and enjoy!

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Whenever I watch TV and see those poor starving kids all over the world, I can’t help but cry. I mean I’d love to be skinny like that, but not with all those flies and death and stuff.  ~ Pop Singer Mariah Carey

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Ol’ Boston Clam Chowder

     There was nothing like 2007 — the banner year for professional sports in Boston. The Red Sox won the World Series. The Patriots were undefeated for so many games. The Celtics also won eight in a row at the beginning of the season, the Bruins got off to a great start by spearing the Sharks, and the Clam Diggers found a bumper crop, too. Therefore this chowder is appropriately named.

  1. In a kettle, sauté a half-cup of bacon. Dump it to the side and cook up two cups of minced onion in its fat.
  2. Pour four cups of fishy stock, three cups of cubed potatoes, and the bacon together.
  3. Throw in salt, pepper, marjoram, and thyme to suit you. 
  4. Stir in a half-cup of dry white wine.

    Drink Whatever You Don't Put In The Stew

  5. Start scalding two cups of both whole milk and cream in a separate saucepan.
  6. Simmer to soften each potato then add three pounds of clams (no shells, OK?) for five minutes before the dairy solution goes into the kettle.
  7. Remove the kettle from the heat and let stand covered for up to an hour.
  8. Reheat the chowder when folks are ready to chow down.
  9. Serve in heated bowls each with a tablespoon of soft butter.
  10. Impress almost everyone by sprinkling parsley on the surface.

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An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile; hoping it will eat him last. 

~ Winston Churchill

 

Although present on the occasion, I have no clear recollection of the events leading up to it.  ~ Winston Churchill

 

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copyright 2008

Confessions of An Oenophile: An American Family Cookbook

by David A. Dailey

http://www.outskirtspress.com/ConfessionsofAnOenophile

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