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Attention: U.S. Senators from Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, Arizona, Maine, and oh West Virginia !! [we don’t need more hearings to conclude that DJT is GUILTY of misdeeds . . . Vote “yea” during impeachment trial] . . . For God’s and the USA’s Sake!

Open Letter to United States Senators – Members of the Impeachment Jury:

For our country’s, the Earth’s, and God’s Sake = Vote “yea”

Dear Senator

As a juror in the upcoming Impeachment trial, we ask that you place non-partisan interests in the future integrity of U.S. elections and improved international relations foremost.

So much is at stake. History books will reflect on the righteousness of your vote. Your constituents will remember whether sound judgment was used in the interest of our society and welfare domestically and around the world.

Evidence is compelling to impeach and remove Mr. Trump for his misdeeds, allowing the Republican Party to nominate a better person for a fair election in 2020.

Just think: What will become of our children and grandchildren?

Sincerely,

David A. Dailey

 

p.s. If you are looking for useful information to make an informed decision, check out any of Max’s Scout Services & Communication’s web-blogs; URL = http://www.MaxsScoutServicesLLC.wordpress.com

A to Z

Jurors of the United States Senate:

Hyde-Smith_Cindy-041718-Hea

My Approved Portraits

Approved GS Retouch tweaked BG 003 “Ernst Blue” FULL SIZED

 

capito

 

My Portrait Sessions

 

p.s Please vote for Impeachment AND removal from office. Trump has sinned many times.

Open Letter to the Trump-Pence Administration: Please Resign and Retain Some Measure of Dignity!!

September 29, 2019                          Volume 9, Issue 4                   ***** Edition

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Nixon and Agnew resigned, thus a Republican-American precedent has been set and the bar has been lowered.

The White House is now worse than the singular drama of a Teapot Dome (1920s) or a Watergate (1970s).

From campaign finance, treason, violations of the Emoluments Clause of the US Constitution, to other high crimes and misdemeanors, aside from ethics and international peace, here’s how the gun-loving D.J. Trump and homophobic Vice President Pence Administration have run afoul of the American law.

  1. Campaign Finance Violations

  2. Bribery

  3. Honest Services Fraud

  4. Extortion

  5. Witness Intimidation

  6. Obstructing Justice

  7. Conspiracy

1. CAMPAIGN FINANCE VIOLATION

It’s a crime for an American to ask a foreigner for help winning a U.S. election.

The whistleblower warned Trump appeared to be doing exactly that, in what legal experts said looks like the strongest case that Trump may have broken the law in the Ukraine saga.

“There’s a strong argument that the president’s conduct violates federal campaign finance law, although I wouldn’t say it’s a slam-dunk case,” said Richard Hasen, a specialist on election law at the University of California Irvine.

A theoretical future prosecutor would need to demonstrate that Trump sought something of value for his reelection from Ukraine’s president, and that he knew the law says he shouldn’t.

In case you forgot: Trump’s inner circle, including his son Don Jr. and the top brass of his campaign, narrowly skated past this one during the Russian investigation, after Special Counsel Robert Mueller concluded that neither of those clauses could be fulfilled.

The whistleblower warned Trump appeared to be doing exactly that, in what legal experts said looks like the strongest case that Trump may have broken the law in the Ukraine saga.

Proving the monetary value of a Biden investigation would be tricky, but expert analysis could be used to show the value exceeds the $25,000 required for a felony, said Hasen, since overall spending in the 2020 election is expected to be in the billions.

And the fact that Trump’s inner circle was investigated by Mueller for this potential crime could be used as evidence that he should have known the rules.

Hyde-Smith_Cindy-041718-Hea

A Republican Juror for Impeachment Vote in the US Senate

2. BRIBERY

Trump’s interaction with the Ukrainian president could potentially count as soliciting a bribe, former prosecutors said.

“The same law that makes it a crime to offer a bribe also makes it a crime to ask for one,” said Patrick Cotter, a former New York prosecutor who helped bring down the mobster John Gotti.

Bribery as defined by 18 USC 201 includes a public official seeking “anything of value” for influencing a public act.

“Trump has exposure for soliciting a bribe under Section 201,” wrote Harry Sandick, a former New York prosecutor, adding that bribery may be “the strongest of any of the proposed lines of charging.”

3. HONEST SERVICES FRAUD

Trump’s behavior toward Ukraine could count as honest services fraud, according to Barbara McQuade, Detroit’s former top federal prosecutor.

“The theory is that by performing an official act in exchange for personal gain, a public official defrauds his constituents of his honest services to make decisions and take actions that are in the best interests of the public,” McQuade wrote Wednesday on the Just Security blog.

Other legal experts agreed.

“I find McQuade’s argument convincing,” wrote Jens David Ohlin, vice dean of Cornell Law School, in response to an email from VICE News. “Though, as she notes, the Supreme Court has severely limited the doctrine. It would have been much easier to describe this as honest services fraud ten years ago before these Supreme Court rulings.”

My Portrait Sessions

Another Juror from a Red State

4. EXTORTION

There’s a fine line between bribery and extortion, from the law’s point of view.

The difference generally hinges on whether the person being asked for a payout is more like an accomplice, or more like a victim, Cotter said. If the person is being threatened, then it may be extortion, he said.

The whistleblower said Trump personally issued instructions to suspend almost $400 million worth of security aid to Ukraine, shortly before pressing Zelensky to “look into” Biden.

But the episode represents a close call, said Sandick, and the nitty-gritty details are crucial.

“It depends on whether Trump is seeking tangible, transferable property, like actual evidence of Biden’s crimes, or whether he is seeking something intangible (an ‘investigation’),” Sandick wrote. “Extortion has been interpreted narrowly to preclude a prosecution when the property sought is purely intangible and non-transferable.”

Extortion seems unlikely to apply to this case, given the language of the relevant federal statute, said Robert Eatinger, former acting general counsel for the CIA.

5. WITNESS INTIMIDATION

After the whistleblower’s complaint emerged, Trump called the source “almost a spy,” before apparently making a dark allusion to capital punishment for treason.

“You know what we used to do in the old days when we were smart? Right? The spies and treason, we used to handle it a little differently than we do now,” Trump said.

Afterwards, top House Democrats accused Trump of witness intimidation and of obstructing their impeachment inquiry.

“The President’s comments today constitute reprehensible witness intimidation and an attempt to obstruct Congress’ impeachment inquiry,” they wrote in a joint letter on Thursday.

But Trump has argued in the past that some of his most incendiary public comments were really just jokes, and he could do so here as well, said Sandick.

“I think that Trump would argue that he was being colorful and not actually threatening to kill the whistleblower,” Sandick said. “I wouldn’t charge it based on what we know now.”

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Senator Ernst

6. OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE

The whistleblower wrote that after Trump’s infamous July 25 phone call with Ukraine’s president, the White House went into “lock down.”

At the advice of White House lawyers, officials took the unorthodox step of moving records of the call into a separate system for protecting highly classified documents.

“That was very unusual,” said Larry Pfeiffer, whose career in intelligence included serving as White House Situation Room director in the Obama administration.

“The White House staff is walking on perilous ground here,” said Duncan Levin, a former New York prosecutor. “That could be a violation of obstruction of justice.”

It remains unclear who made the decision. And any theoretical obstruction charge would depend on important details, including the corrupt intent to obstruct and the existence of a pending investigation or legal proceeding.

“Obstruction is one of the harder cases to bring,” said Rocah. “You’d have to show they were covering it up not just because it looks bad, but because Congress or the DOJ was going to be looking into it.”

Yet this would hardly be the first time Trump’s been accused of obstructing justice. Mueller’s report outlined multiple instances of obstructive behavior, in evidence so damning that over 1,000 former prosecutors signed a joint letter stating that anyone else would have been charged.

The president can’t be indicted while in office, according to DOJ policy, and Mueller said that meant he couldn’t reach a final decision on whether Trump committed obstruction.

7. CONSPIRACY

Reaching an agreement with others to commit any of these other crimes would set up the possibility of a conspiracy charge.

“A conspiracy is just folks getting together to commit a crime,” said Cotter. “You could potentially have conspiracy to commit honest services fraud, conspiracy to obstruct justice or conspiracy to solicit a bribe.”

A conspiracy charge requires not just an agreement, however, but also at least one overt act.

That’s not easy to prove. Mueller, for example, evaluated whether to bring conspiracy charges against members of the Trump campaign for participating in Russia’s election interference activities, but ultimately decided the evidence was insufficient to prove the case beyond a reasonable doubt.

“There’s a strong argument that the president’s conduct violates federal campaign finance law, although I wouldn’t say it’s a slam-dunk case,” said Richard Hasen, a specialist on election law at the University of California Irvine.

A theoretical future prosecutor would need to demonstrate that Trump sought something of value for his reelection from Ukraine’s president, and that he knew the law says he shouldn’t.

In case you forgot: Trump’s inner circle, including his son Don Jr. and the top brass of his campaign, narrowly skated past this one during the Russian investigation, after Special Counsel Robert Mueller concluded that neither of those clauses could be fulfilled

Proving the monetary value of a Biden investigation would be tricky, but expert analysis could be used to show the value exceeds the $25,000 required for a felony, said Hasen, since overall spending in the 2020 election is expected to be in the billions.

And the fact that Trump’s inner circle was investigated by Mueller for this potential crime could be used as evidence that he should have known the rules.

Even Fox News legal analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano thinks the evidence looks strong against Trump on this one.

“Trump apparently personally and directly committed the crime for which he claimed Mueller exonerated him,” Napolitano concluded.

The Department of Justice, however, said that after reviewing the record of Trump’s Ukraine phone call, it found “there was no campaign finance violation and that no further action was warranted.”

That decision has been criticized by legal experts.

Read: Trump’s Ukraine Scandal Is Also Attorney General Bill Barr’s Scandal

“It doesn’t sound like they interviewed the whistleblower or anybody involved,” said Nick Akerman, a former member of the Nixon-era Whitewater prosecution team. “They didn’t really do a criminal investigation. The whole thing was just put under the rug.”

Thanks to Greg Walters of The Week for this reporting.

capito

Which State Does this Senator Represent?

Indeed, the mere fact that there is so much corruption prevents any single episode … but it is the totality that matters. A corrupt ‘miasma’ has enveloped Washington. For generations, both parties upheld that the government would abide rules, laws, and norms dividing from all presidents’ personal and political interests.

The norm of bureaucratic professionalism and fairness is a pillar of the political legitimacy and economic strength of the American system, the thing that separates countries like the U.S. from countries like Russia, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, and China The decay of American culture is difficult to quantify since 2017, but the signs are everywhere. ‘Trump’s stench’ is slowly seeping into every corner of government.

To be sure intimidating a novice foreign leader and threaten to weaken Ukraine’s national defenses, dovetails neatly with Trump’s pro-Russian stance. Fact: The N.Y. Post reports that Trump is using the aid, which enjoys bipartisan support, as an extortion device.

By conscripting foreign countries to rough up U. S. citizens and domestic political rivals, Trump has been fracking new ground.

During the ’16 presidential campaign, Trump denied concerns about the unprecedented conflicts of interest that would arise from him running a business – at the same time he wields enormous international power. Republicans in Congress have behaved with no concern whatsoever about Trump’s corruption, refusing to take even modest steps like compelling the release of his tax returns, which he had three years ago promised to reveal.

“… Corrupt the Entire Government”

By Jonathan Chait -From the New Yorker Magazine – 9-9-2019

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The following by David A. F. N. Dailey – The Sun Chronicles – September 23, 2019

 

As my Mom would say, “This president is killing me.”

 

It is worse than University of Notre Dame Band getting beat up by the #3 University of Georgia football team. Both behaviors are criminal. They say the POTUS cannot be indicted for criminal acts.

 

Ivanka Trump‘s father is more interested in a good photo opportunity than protecting my family and friends from death. I am comforted that we presently do not have any young adults serving in the military under DJ Trump’s command.

 

I wish Ivanka Trump and family would do an intervention and get their father to resign; even Nixon and VP Spiro Agnew were able to resign with some dignity.

 

U. S. Gun Policy [with Justice Stevens op-ed, written ’18] included with The Dailey Sun~Chronicles Volume VII, Issue 31, Fall 2018

Refer to these articles…

via U. S. Gun Policy [with Justice Stevens op-ed, written ’18] included with The Dailey Sun~Chronicles Volume VII, Issue 31, Fall 2018

Addendum:

August 2019

If the President did the right thing:

  1. He would have apologized for his racist language
  2.  He would have called Congress (today) for a special session on Gun Controls and Impeachment proceedings
  3. Trump would stop lying

Russians are Coming! Current Evidence of Criminal “Jhacking”

On Friday, the US attorney in the Eastern District of Virginia unsealed a criminal complaint accusing a Russian national named Elena Alekseevna Khusyaynova of conspiring to interfere in the US political system. The document maintains that as a financial officer, Khusyaynova was part of the effort mounted by the Internet Research Agency, a troll farm in St. Petersburg funded by a Russian oligarch close to Vladimir Putin, to use Facebook and Twitter accounts to influence politics in the United States. The IRA’s role in Putin’s attack on the 2016 election—a scheme that was part of what’s known as “Project Lakhta”—has already been revealed. But the complaint highlights a less-known fact: that the Russian attack “continues to this day” and is partially aimed at the 2018 midterm campaign. That is, the United States, as it heads toward a crucial election, remains under assault by the Kremlin.

President Donald Trump, whose election, according to a 2017 US intelligence community assessment, was one goal of the Russian plot, has refused to seriously address Russia’s covert exploitation of US social media to undermine American politics. For instance, on September 27, 2017, after Facebook revealed that Russian government operatives had secretly placed political ads on the site during the 2016 campaign, Trump dismissed the matter and tweeted that the “hoax continues, now it’s ads on Facebook.” Yet his own Justice Department now says Russia “to this day” is conducting what Project Lakhta has internally called “information warfare against the United States of America.”

The DOJ contends that the “strategic goal” of the Russian operation is to “sow division and discord in the US political system, including by creating social and political polarization, undermining faith in democratic institutions, and influencing US elections, including the upcoming 2018 midterm elections.” According to the criminal complaint, the monthly budget of Project Lakhta, which does not focus exclusively on the United States, is generally between $1 million and $2 million. In a press release, the DOJ states that “The conspirators’ alleged activities did not exclusively adopt one ideological view.” But most of the examples cited in the criminal complaint—which is full of details indicating the FBI obtained copies of the internal records of several Russian companies involved with the IRA—are actions that bolster Trump and conservatives.

As the complaint puts it, the Russian operation aimed to “inflame passions on a wide variety of topics, including immigration, gun control and the Second Amendment, the Confederate flag, race relations, LGBT issues, the Women’s March, and the NFL national anthem debate,” and that it sought to exploit specific events in the United States, including the Las Vegas mass shooting and the “Unite the Right” rally organized by white supremacists in Charlottesville.

^^^ first published by Mother Jones – October 20, 2018 ^^^

HELL

Doing Dirty Laundry – Like Hell on Earth

More Lies and Misleading Statements Spoken in Montana

Wednesday, October 17, 2018, from Missoula

Really, a rally in a hangar not on an air force base?
1. “I love these hangars. I love a hangar. There’s nothing like a hangar. You get out of the plane, you walk over, and we have massive crowds,” says Pres. Trump.
I admit that I would probably buy a T-shirt with the phrase “I love a hangar” on it. Also, away we go!
2. “I wouldn’t want to be the one that walks into your house and says, ‘Give me that gun.’ Right? Nobody has the courage to do that. But Matt is going to protect your Second Amendment.”
Here Trump is relying on one of his oft-repeated falsehoods about those who support gun control measures: That their ultimate goal is confiscation of all guns, including from law-abiding citizens. While there is the occasional radical voice within the gun control movement who suggests something like this, no mainstream Democratic politician has come close to saying it. In fact. both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton expressly rejected the idea that they had any interest in any sort of gun collection program. Trump knows that. He just doesn’t care. Because the prospect of a politician coming to your house and taking your gun is something that works for him politically.
3. “The unemployment rate just fell to the lowest level in over 50 years.”
4. “More Americans are now working than ever before.”
This is also true but with an asterisk. And the asterisk is that there are just more Americans today than there were 50 years ago. So, yes, more are working. Because there are more of them.
5. “That was one of those quickies. I love those states. You know, the polls close. Polls have just closed in the state of Montana. Trump has won Montana.”
The 2016 election ended 710 days ago.
6. “We like the — we like the — it’s just a flowing. They do comma. They don’t do — they do a comma.”
I genuinely have no idea what the hell he is talking about here. But it is flowing. With the comma. You always do the comma.
7. “In a beautiful ceremony at the White House, we proudly swore in the newest member of the United States Supreme Court, Justice Brett Kavanaugh.”
Technically, Kavanuagh was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice days earlier by Chief Justice John Roberts and retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. The ceremony Trump is referencing here was purely for show

8. “And come Election Day, Americans will remember Kavanaugh and they will remember all sorts of other things, because that was a shameful act.”

There’s no question that the Republican base was fired up in the wake of Brett Kavanuagh’s confirmation fight. Trump — and Republicans — are hoping this passion keeps burning for the next 18 days.
9. “This will be an election of Kavanaugh, the caravan, law and order, and common sense.”
Ads — and polling — suggest this is going to be an election about health care.
10. “But a lot of money has been passing to people to come up and try and get to the border by Election Day, because they think that’s a negative for us. Number one, they’re being stopped. And number two, regardless, that’s our issue.”
OK. So the President of the United States is suggesting money is being paid to people traveling in a caravan headed to try to gain entry into the United States for baldly political reasons — which, I think, he is suggesting are that it will make immigration an issue in the election and that Democrats think they win on that issue. I mean, I think? There’s a whole lot of logic jumps happening here.
11. “The one thing, they stick together, but they wanted that caravan and there are those that say that caravan didn’t just happen. It didn’t just happen. A lot of reasons that caravan, 4,000 people.”
Again, Trump signaling — with zero proof — that Democrats are somehow behind the caravan of immigrants moving toward the US.
14. “Do you ever see when the fake news interviews them? And then they try and cut it, but they — they’ll go to a person holding a sign who gets paid by Soros or somebody, right? That’s what happens.”
Another common Trump conspiracy theory: The news seeks out protesters — and these protesters are paid for by George Soros, the liberal billionaire. This is, um, not true.
15. “But did you see the signs? They’re brand-new. They’re beautiful, the black-and-white signs. Everybody has the same size, right from the finest printer in Washington. Do you think the people — those are not signs made in the basement. They were all identical.”
Trump can keep saying that the protests against Kavanuagh were not organic. But that doesn’t make it true.
16. “It’s a whole — hey, look, there’s a lot of rigged things going on in this country, you know about that. There are a lot of rigged things going on.”
These lines are at the heart of Trump’s appeal. The system is rigged against you, normal person, and only Trump will tell you the truth about it. And only Donald Trump will fight for you, the little guy, against these elites who think they are smarter and better than you.
voterepDem
17. “Obstruction. You know, I just walked in, and a big, strong guy grabbed me. And he was almost crying. It happens every time. And many times. And he said, sir, ‘Mr. President, thank you so much for saving our country.'”

Two thoughts here: a) How did Trump go from attacking the Mueller probe for looking into whether he obstructed the investigation to a big guy hugging him? b) Trump says that big, strong guys hug him and thank him for saving America outside every rally. Does this actually happen?

18. “He’s — he runs eight times. ‘Sir, I won five elections.’ I said, well, you got me there. I ran once, and I won one election, but it’s the presidency, right? That’s right.”
Always, always, always the obsessions with how he is better and special.
19. “That’s all the time we need to make America great again. Make America great again. Is that — is that maybe the greatest slogan in the history of runs?”
Many people are saying that. Believe me. Big time.
20. “It is incredible the deep state where they don’t even look at her. Isn’t it incredible?”
To be clear: This is the President of the United States openly alleging there is a group of people embedded within the federal bureaucracy who are operating a conspiracy to protect Hillary Clinton and to get him, somehow.
21. “But I like acid-washing, because that really says it. She acid-washes 33,000, so that nobody can ever find — but they’re around some place. I think that maybe — maybe they’re at the State Department.”
It is true that Clinton deleted roughly 50% (or 33,000) of the emails she sent from her private server as secretary of state. Those emails were determined, by a Clinton lawyer, to be personal — and with no professional relevance. As to the idea that the State Department has them, I have no idea what Trump is talking about. Remember that he asked the Russians to try to find those deleted emails during the summer of 2016.
22. “But maybe they’re at the State Department. They could very well be at the Department of Justice, if you can believe that whole deal. But we’re just being quiet. We’re being quiet. Do you know why? There’s been no collusion.”
WHAAAAAAA? So the deleted Clinton emails are either at State or Justice? What proof of this does Trump have? (He doesn’t have any.) Also, why is “collusion” mentioned here???
23. “If I ever called the Russians, the first one to know about it would be the state of Montana, and they wouldn’t be too happy. Can you imagine? Let’s call the Russians? It’s a disgrace.”
The allegation is not that Trump “called” the Russians to help with a state. Its that the Russians, believing that Trump would be a better president for them, ran a campaign of misinformation and interference to try to bring about that result. The intelligence community unanimously affirmed that happened. Trump has never been willing to accept it.
24. “And look at all the women for Trump signs. Here we go again. It’s the same thing. Everyone says, but will he get the women?”
Trump won 41% of women in the 2016 election, according to exit polling. His job approval among women is 28% in the October CNN-SSRS poll.
25. “Everybody else had cloth on their face, and I probably would have, also, cloth that was water, right, wet, on their face. She sat there, hey, what else is new? That’s the way she is.”
In which Trump touts his wife’s toughness because she didn’t put a cloth to her face when smoke entered the cabin of her plane due to a mechanical error. (Everybody was safe.) Remember that for Trump, toughness is everything.
26. “No, Mike is great. We have — we had such great people. We had such great people. And a lot of talented people. And the end result is this is where we are. And we’re doing a lot of good.”
Trump logic flow: Mike Huckabee → great people → talented people → we are where we are → doing a lot of good.
27. “And you walk around in those conditions, you can’t fake it. You can’t fake it. So that’s one good thing. Nobody ever says that any more. That’s one of the — might be one of the best things that’s happened to me in a long time.”
Trump here is touting the fact that people don’t ask whether he wears a toupee any more because he walks around areas devastated by natural disasters and there is a lot of wind blowing. Yes, seriously.
28. “Barbara Walters interviewed me. Do you mind if I play with your hair? Do you

remember that? And then numerous people have done that. But that’s OK. But the choice could not be more clear. Democrats produce mobs. Republicans produce jobs.”

He said these two thing back to back. There are no sentences I omitted. Barbara Walters on his hair to Democrats producing mobs.
29. “Well, it’s big sky. I guess there’s a reason for everything, right? No, it’s just — I got out and I’m looking — I’ve been here many times — but I got out and I’m looking — I say, that really is big sky.”
[looks around, wondering if anyone else is hearing this]
30. “Democrats have become the party of crime. It’s true.”
[narrator voice] It’s not.
31. “I said, I’m going to put that in. I’m going to say that when I make speeches. Nobody’s ever challenged it. Maybe they have. Who knows? I have to always say that, because then they’ll say they did actually challenge it, and they’ll put like — then they’ll say he gets a Pinocchio.”
This is some meta-Trump right here. He explains how he told his aides he was going to start calling Democrats the party of crime, then says no one has ever challenged that assertion, then says they actually have, then says he doesn’t care if it’s true or not.
32. “But Greg is smart. And by the way, never wrestle him. You understand that? Never. Any guy that can do a body slam, he’s my kind of … he was my guy.

Rep. Greg Gianforte pleaded guilty to assaulting a reporter who was asking him questions. HA HA HA HA. Wait, what the actual hell?

33. “But I’ve done so many campaign — I’m so far ahead. But — but we’ve started the wall. And it’s moving. And we’re going to get it, but get me some Republican votes, please.”
One order of world salad, please.
34. “He’s — now, it’s hard for a Republican to win in California, because it’s become, like, crazy. But all of a sudden are Republicans making big progress. It’s going to be very interesting to see what happens in that race.”
Trump is talking here about the California governor’s race. A Los Angeles Times poll that came out two days ago showed Democrat Gavin Newsom with a 23-point lead over Republican John Cox. So….
35. “Justice Kavanaugh, number one in his class at Yale”
Yale doesn’t have class rank.
36. “And in the case especially of Justice Kavanaugh, the lies that were made up, the stories that came out, and he didn’t — he honestly — I’m pretty good at this stuff — he honestly never heard of this stuff. He never heard of it. It was a big con job. You’ve heard me say that. It was a con job.”
Remember that Trump initially said that Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were both teenagers, deserved to be treated with respect and have her story told. Now, of course, he believes her to be part of some sort of secret Democratic plot to oust Kavanaugh. The evidence for this claim? There is none.
37. “Remember? Remember Jon Lovitz, the liar, remember Jon Lovitz? Yeah, yeah, I’m a businessman, that’s right. I went to — yeah, yeah, I went to Harvard. Yeah, that’s right. I went to Harvard. I’m a businessman. That was, like, a female version of Jon Lovitz.
I DO appreciate Trump’s reference to a 1980s “Saturday Night Live” sketch in which Lovitz played Tommy Flanagan aka the Pathological Liar. I’m not sure a man who has said more than 5,000 false or misleading claims in his first 601 days in office should be evoking a pathological liar.
38. “Remember, he challenged me to a fight, and that was fine. And when I said he wouldn’t last long, he’d be down faster than Greg would take him down.”
The President of the United States saying he would punch out the former vice president of the United State faster than a member of Congress assaulted a reporter. All totally normal stuff here!
39. “He’d be down so fast. Remember? Faster than Greg. I’d have to go very fast. I’d have to immediately connect.”
“I will be so presidential, you will be so bored.” — Donald Trump
40. “He’s a handsome, wonderful father.”
41. “A little bit like Justice Kavanaugh, you know, really a very fine, high-quality, handsome guy.”
Two descriptions of former White House physician Ronny Jackson in which Trump says he is “handsome.” This is yet more evidence of how much focus Trump puts on whether people look the part. He views hiring for his administration as casting — and you have to look good to make it on the Trump Show.
42. “I came up with the name Pocahontas, and they once said you must apologize for that. I said, why? Well, it’s not nice what you’re doing. I said, OK, I’d like to apologize to the real Pocahontas.”
Classic Trump. Deriding Elizabeth Warren by referring to her as a famous Native American woman isn’t his problem, it’s the problem of the political correctness police.
43. “By the way, they keep saying, will he do well with women? Remember last time? They said the same thing. We did — we did very well with women. I think I probably won because of women, I hate to tell you, men.”
He got 41% of women’s votes. So, he definitively did not win because of women.
44. “Do you know that we have the hottest economy, as big as we are? We were going down. We have the hottest economy on Earth. People are moving back in.”
Economy! So hot right now!
45. “Because we are American and our hearts bleed red, white, and blue. You know that.”

Remembering the Loss of 1,000 Homes, the Existence Today of over 1,000 Homeless People the Days After Washington D.C. ‘Crashed and Burned’

Over 1,000 people lost their homes in beautiful Sonoma County last year and to the day after that democracy “crashed and burned” in the U.S. Senate and Supreme Court.

On October 8, 2017, the Tubbs Fire destroyed Santa Rosa, On October 6, 2018, white women senators voted along with old white men to place a man of privilege on the Supreme Court, and today over 1,000 men and women are homeless in San Francisco.

Who shares the blame?

capito

Senator Capito of West Virginia

My Approved Portraits

Senator Joni Ernst of Iowa

My Portrait Sessions

Senator Deb Fischer of Nebraska

Hyde-Smith_Cindy-041718-Hea

Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith

of Mississippi