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Juneteenth Anniversary for Human Rights

Modern society is still faced with human trafficking, fair wage discussions,

union activities, and issues of human rights equality under the law.

 

The Dailey Sun~Chronicles – “No Rumors, No Fakes – Just the Facts, Jack!”

 

Volume VIII, Issue 43                                  6 – 19 – 2019                           ***** Edition

 

“Annual Observance of Juneteenth”

Juneteenth – the formal end of slavery (by law, on paper) throughout the United States in the mid-19th Century – is an observance all mankind should take heed.

juneteenth

The following was taken from Wikipedia:

During the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, with an effective date of January 1, 1863. It declared that all enslaved persons in the Confederate States of America in rebellion and not in Union hands were to be freed. This excluded the five states known later as border states, which were the four “slave states” not in rebellion – Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri – and those counties of Virginia soon to form the state of West Virginia, and also the three zones under Union occupation: the state of Tennessee, lower Louisiana, and Southeast Virginia.

More isolated geographically, Texas was not a battleground, and thus the people held there as slaves were not affected by the Emancipation Proclamation unless they escaped.[7] Planters and other slaveholders had migrated into Texas from eastern states to escape the fighting, and many brought enslaved people with them, increasing by the thousands the enslaved population in the state at the end of the Civil War.[8] Although most enslaved people lived in rural areas, more than 1,000 resided in both Galveston and Houston by 1860, with several hundred in other large towns.[9] By 1865, there were an estimated 250,000 enslaved people in Texas.[8]

The news of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender on April 9 reached Texas later in the month.[10] The Army of the Trans-Mississippi did not surrender until June 2.[8] On June 18, Union Army General Gordon Granger arrived at Galveston Island with 2,000 federal troops to occupy Texas on behalf of the federal government.[7] The following day, standing on the balcony of Galveston’s Ashton Villa, Granger read aloud the contents of “General Order No. 3”, announcing the total emancipation of those held as slaves:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.[11]

Emancipation Day celebration in Richmond, Virginia in 1905 – the 50th anniversary

Formerly enslaved people in Galveston rejoiced in the streets after the announcement, although in the years afterward many struggled to work through the changes against resistance of whites. The following year, freedmen organized the first of what became the annual celebration of Juneteenth in Texas.[11] In some cities African-Americans were barred from using public parks because of state-sponsored segregation of facilities. Across parts of Texas, freed people pooled their funds to purchase land to hold their celebrations, such as Houston‘s Emancipation Park, Mexia‘s Booker T. Washington Park, and Emancipation Park in Austin.[8][11]

Although the date is sometimes referred to as the “traditional end of slavery in Texas” it was given legal status in a series of Texas Supreme Court decisions between 1868 and 1874.[12]

In the early 20th century, economic and political forces led to a decline in Juneteenth celebrations. From 1890 to 1908, Texas and all former Confederate states passed new constitutions or amendments that effectively disenfranchised black people, excluding them from the political process. White-dominated state legislatures passed Jim Crow laws imposing second-class status. The Great Depression forced many black people off farms and into the cities to find work. In these urban environments, African Americans had difficulty taking the day off to celebrate. The Second Great Migration began during World War II, when many black people migrated to the West Coast where skilled jobs in the defense industry were opening up.[13] From 1940 through 1970, in the second wave of the Great Migration, more than 5 million black people left Texas, Louisiana and other parts of the South for the North and West Coast. As historian Isabel Wilkerson writes, “The people from Texas took Juneteenth Day to Los Angeles, Oakland, Seattle, and other places they went.”[14]

By the 1950s and 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement focused the attention of African-American youth on the struggle for racial equality and the future, but many linked these struggles to the historical struggles of their ancestors. Following the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign to Washington, DC called by Rev. Ralph Abernathy, many attendees returned home and initiated Juneteenth celebrations in areas where the day was not previously celebrated.

Since the 1980s and 1990s, the holiday has been more widely celebrated among African-American communities. In 1994 a group of community leaders gathered at Christian Unity Baptist Church in New Orleans, Louisiana to work for greater national celebration of Juneteenth.[15] Expatriates have celebrated it in cities abroad, such as Paris.[16] Some US military bases in other countries sponsor celebrations, in addition to those of private groups.[16][17]

Although the holiday is still mostly unknown outside African-American communities, it has gained mainstream awareness through depictions in entertainment media, such as episodes of TV series Atlanta (2016)[18] and Black-ish (2017),[19] the latter of which featured musical numbers about the holiday by Aloe Blacc, The Roots,[20] and Fonzworth Bentley.[21][22]

 

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Footnotes:

  1. “Juneteenth Celebrated in Coachella”. Black Voice News. June 22, 2011. Archived from the original on January 22, 2012.
  2. “Juneteenth”. Merriam Webster Dictionary. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  3. “National Observance of Juneteenth is Still a Struggle”. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  4. Taylor, 2002. pp. 28–29.
  5. “How to Celebrate”. Juneteenth.com. Retrieved June 19, 2014.[self-published source]
  6. “Mascogos. Siempre listos para partir”. El Universal (in Spanish). September 19, 2016. Retrieved July 31, 2017. Sin embargo, la fiesta de la comunidad es el 19 de junio – el Juneteenth Day en Estados Unidos – el día que los esclavos de Galveston, Texas, supieron que eran libres.
  7. Cruz, Gilbert (June 18, 2008). “A Brief History of Juneteenth”. Time magazine. Retrieved May 30, 2013.
  8. Gates, Henry Louis, Jr. “What Is Juneteenth?”. The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross. PBS. Originally posted on The Root. Retrieved September 30, 2014.
  9. Barr (1996), p. 24.
  10. The Texas Republican (Marshall), April 28, 1865, p. 2, contains a reference to the surrender
  11. “Juneteenth”. Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Retrieved July 6, 2006.
  12. Campbell, Randolph (1984). “The End of Slavery in Texas: A Research Note”. Southwestern Historical Quarterly. 88 (1): 71–80.
  13. Adams, Luther (November 29, 2010). Way Up North in Louisville: African American Migration in the Urban South, 1930–1970. University of North Carolina Press. ISBN978-0807899434.
  14. Wilkerson, Isabel (2010). The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration. New York: Random House. Retrieved June 19, 2015.
  15. Chandler, D.L. (June 19, 2012). “Juneteenth: Celebrating The Early Moments Of Freedom Today”. News One. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  16. Moskin, Julie (June 18, 2004). “An Obscure Texas Celebration Makes Its Way Across the U.S.” The New York Times. Retrieved April 28, 2011.
  17. “The World Celebrates Freedom”. Juneteenth.com. Retrieved June 19, 2006.
  18. Ho, Rodney (October 25, 2016). “FX’s ‘Atlanta’ recap (‘Juneteenth’): season 1, episode 9”. Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  19. Framke, Caroline (October 4, 2017). “Black-ish’s musical episode about Juneteenth is a pointed lesson on American ignorance”. Vox. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  20. “I Am A Slave”. YouTube. ABC News. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  21. “We Built This”. YouTube. ABC Television Network. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  22. Butler, Berhonie (October 4, 2017). “‘Blackish’ gives a powerful history lesson – with nods to ‘Hamilton’ and ‘Schoolhouse Rock'”. Washington Post. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  23. Dingus, Anne (June 2001). “Once a Texas-only holiday marking the end of slavery, Juneteenth is now celebrated nationwide with high spirits and hot barbecue”. Texas Monthly. Retrieved October 11, 2013.

 

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 – Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas, LLC –

from Woodside, California 94062-2448

“The Dailey Sun~Chronicles”

 

Alabama is a Sad Example that Respect for Human Life Does Not Extend Beyond the Womb

 

By the way,

Alabama has the fourth worst infant mortality rate in the country.
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb. (Credit: Getty Images)
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb. (Credit: Getty Images)

After signing the country’s strictest abortion ban into law Wednesday, Alabama Gov.

Kay Ivey (R) explained her reasoning in a statement, citing “Alabamians’ deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God.”

But that belief is not reflected in the state’s abysmal statistics when it comes to child mortality, child poverty, food insecurity, education, child care, or paid family leave. Indeed, Ivey’s stated commitment to giving “every person the best chance for a quality life and promising future” doesn’t seem to extend beyond the womb.

Under Alabama’s total abortion ban, providers could face jail time of 10 to 99 years for providing abortions. Patients are exempt from criminal and civil charges. The only exception is if the health of the pregnant person is at serious risk. There are no exceptions for rape or incest. The law will go into effect in 2020, but is expected to be met with lawsuits before then

But the Alabama legislature has done little to tackle this problem, choosing instead to focus primarily on “fringe issues and oddball causes that don’t improve Alabamians’ lives and health,” the editorial board of a local newspaper wrote in 2018.

The same holds true of the state’s child poverty rate. A 2018 report by VOICES for Alabama Children found that there were more children living in poverty in 2018 than in 2000. About 26.5% of children in Alabama live in poverty, including about 30% of children under the age of 5.

Alabama is also one of the most food insecure states in the country, with more than 16% of the population struggling to afford food. This means that more than one in five children grow up hungry. The problem, as Hunger Free America CEO Joel Berg explained to Alabama Today, has much to do with the state’s lack of a minimum wage, instead abiding by the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

“It’s no surprise that we again found that states with higher minimum wages have less hunger among working people and states with lower minimum wages had more hunger among working people,” he said.

Exacerbating the situation are recent drops in food stamp recipients, thanks to the expiration of a federal waiver that allowed Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to be exempt from work requirements. Now, all able-bodied SNAP recipients between the ages of 18 and 49 who aren’t raising children must have at least a part-time job to qualify for benefits. Last year, 38,000 Alabamians lost eligibility to food stamps.

education. The state’s per pupil funding of $9,497 is significantly lower than the national average of about $11,400. Similarly, Alabama has done little to enact regulations for childcare services, allowing hundreds of child care centers to claim a religious exemption from licensing, even as child injuries and deaths at unlicensed centers have garnered attention over the past few years.

The average family in Alabama has a tough time affording child care, as the cost of taking care of one infant demands 11% of a family’s income. Research by the Economic Policy Institute found that this cost is “out of reach for low-wage workers.”

Making matters worse, Alabama does not have a statewide paid family leave policy. According to the National Partnership for Women and Families, “This means Alabamians face impossible choices when new children are born or adopted and when serious personal or family health needs inevitably arise.”

Time to Act – Help Generation Z Americans Manage Their Anxiety

Attempts to shield children from words, ideas, and people that might cause them emotional discomfort are bad for the students. They are bad for the workplace, which will be mired in unending litigation if student expectations of safety are carried forward. They are bad for American democracy, which is already paralyzed by worsening partisanship. When the ideas, values, and speech of the other side are seen not just as wrong but as willfully aggressive toward innocent victims, it is hard to imagine the kind of mutual respect, negotiation, and compromise that are needed to make politics a positive-sum game.

Rather than trying to protect students from words and ideas that they will inevitably encounter, colleges should do all they can to equip students to thrive in a world full of words and ideas that they cannot control.

Using Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques and effective medicines can be implemented to help Generation Z overcome their anxiety.

MEDICINE (#13) and COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY

A partial list from Robert L. Leahy, Stephen J. F. Holland, and Lata K. McGinn’s Treatment Plans and Interventions for Depression and Anxiety Disorders (2012).

  1. Mind reading. You assume that you know what people think without having sufficient evidence of their thoughts. “He thinks I’m a loser.”
  2. Fortune-telling. You predict the future negatively: things will get worse, or there is danger ahead. “I’ll fail that exam,” or “I won’t get the job.”
  3. Catastrophizing. You believe that what has happened or will happen will be so awful and unbearable that you won’t be able to stand it. “It would be terrible if I failed.”
  4. Labeling. You assign global negative traits to yourself and others. “I’m undesirable,” or “He’s a rotten person.”
  5. Discounting positives. You claim that the positive things you or others do are trivial. “That’s what wives are supposed to do—so it doesn’t count when she’s nice to me,” or “Those successes were easy, so they don’t matter.”
  6. Negative filtering. You focus almost exclusively on the negatives and seldom notice the positives. “Look at all of the people who don’t like me.”
  7. Overgeneralizing. You perceive a global pattern of negatives on the basis of a single incident. “This generally happens to me. I seem to fail at a lot of things.”
  8. Dichotomous thinking. You view events or people in all-or-nothing terms. “I get rejected by everyone,” or “It was a complete waste of time.”
  9. Blaming. You focus on the other person as the source of your negative feelings, and you refuse to take responsibility for changing yourself. “She’s to blame for the way I feel now,” or “My parents caused all my problems.”
  10. What if? You keep asking a series of questions about “what if” something happens, and you fail to be satisfied with any of the answers. “Yeah, but what if I get anxious?” or “What if I can’t catch my breath?”
  11. Emotional reasoning. You let your feelings guide your interpretation of reality. “I feel depressed; therefore, my marriage is not working out.sco
  12. Inability to disconfirm. You reject any evidence or arguments that might contradict your negative thoughts. For example, when you have the thought I’m unlovable, you reject as irrelevant any evidence that people like you.

 

antianxiety meds

COPYRIGHT 2018

MAX’S SCOUT SERVICES & COMMUNICATIONS OF THE AMERICAS, LLC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dailey Sun~Chronicles “News You Can Use” “No Rumors, No Fakes, Just the Facts, Jack!” “All the Good News”

 

Volume VII, Issue 24                                   10 – 24 – 2018                         ***** Edition

What Has Been Happening in America

 

This issue is a tribute to my dear daughter and birthday girl.

October 24th also happens to be the annual anniversary of United Nations Day.

 

Along the North Atlantic Coast . . .

Dateline: Norfolk, Virginia

A woman reports to police that a man broke into her home, made them breakfast, took a shower, and washed his clothes.

Dateline: Washington, D.C.

The Trump Administration announces plans to reduce taxes for middle-class, build the Mexican Wall with Saudi Arabian blood money, give Ivanka Trump designed and Chinese-made goods to African Americans, and not to ever lie or mislead Americans.

Dateline: Greenville, S.C.

Police caught a student with a knife that she used to snort cocaine before class.

Dateline: Greenville, N.C.

Police sought treatment for a pit bull who dug up a loaded .38-caliber pistol.

Dateline: Lehigh Acres, Florida

Senior found dead with his head stuck in an electric car window.

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In the North American Wild West . . .

Dateline: Gunnison, Utah

School district brushed aside a claim of sexual abuse as a case of “boys being boys.”

Dateline: Los Angeles, California

A former Republican congressional aide, Michael Kimbrew, has received a sentence of 18 months in prison for accepting a $5,000 bribe.

Dateline: Laramie, Wyoming

“The World Needs More Cowboys” is the battle cry of the University of Wyoming’s half a million-dollar marketing campaign.

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witch
                                                                           

Remembering the “Witch Hunt”

This Halloween Week

 

In the American Heartland . . .

Dateline: Willard, Ohio

Two men who hopped a freight train were arrested after they phoned 911 to report that their train was moving too fast.

 

Dateline: Marquette, Michigan

The county accepted a $65K grant to keep an eye on the U.S. – Canada border.

 

Dateline: Peru, Indiana

State Police busts have netted what they call “Donald J. Trump-shaped” ecstasy pills.

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Elsewhere in the United States of America . . .

Dateline: Kansas City, Missouri

Over 70 community and religious leaders are requesting that all politicians stop vilifying immigrants.

 

Dateline: CNN

Debate continues about the deep meaning of the president’s chosen vocabulary particularly during his rallies. The Washington Post and others have lost track of how many instances of misinformation, falsehoods, and lies have been promoted.

 

 

 

copyright MMXVIII – Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas, LLC –

“The San Dailey Sun~Chronicles”

More Lies and Misleading Statements Spoken in Montana

Wednesday, October 17, 2018, from Missoula

Really, a rally in a hangar not on an air force base?
1. “I love these hangars. I love a hangar. There’s nothing like a hangar. You get out of the plane, you walk over, and we have massive crowds,” says Pres. Trump.
I admit that I would probably buy a T-shirt with the phrase “I love a hangar” on it. Also, away we go!
2. “I wouldn’t want to be the one that walks into your house and says, ‘Give me that gun.’ Right? Nobody has the courage to do that. But Matt is going to protect your Second Amendment.”
Here Trump is relying on one of his oft-repeated falsehoods about those who support gun control measures: That their ultimate goal is confiscation of all guns, including from law-abiding citizens. While there is the occasional radical voice within the gun control movement who suggests something like this, no mainstream Democratic politician has come close to saying it. In fact. both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton expressly rejected the idea that they had any interest in any sort of gun collection program. Trump knows that. He just doesn’t care. Because the prospect of a politician coming to your house and taking your gun is something that works for him politically.
3. “The unemployment rate just fell to the lowest level in over 50 years.”
4. “More Americans are now working than ever before.”
This is also true but with an asterisk. And the asterisk is that there are just more Americans today than there were 50 years ago. So, yes, more are working. Because there are more of them.
5. “That was one of those quickies. I love those states. You know, the polls close. Polls have just closed in the state of Montana. Trump has won Montana.”
The 2016 election ended 710 days ago.
6. “We like the — we like the — it’s just a flowing. They do comma. They don’t do — they do a comma.”
I genuinely have no idea what the hell he is talking about here. But it is flowing. With the comma. You always do the comma.
7. “In a beautiful ceremony at the White House, we proudly swore in the newest member of the United States Supreme Court, Justice Brett Kavanaugh.”
Technically, Kavanuagh was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice days earlier by Chief Justice John Roberts and retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. The ceremony Trump is referencing here was purely for show

8. “And come Election Day, Americans will remember Kavanaugh and they will remember all sorts of other things, because that was a shameful act.”

There’s no question that the Republican base was fired up in the wake of Brett Kavanuagh’s confirmation fight. Trump — and Republicans — are hoping this passion keeps burning for the next 18 days.
9. “This will be an election of Kavanaugh, the caravan, law and order, and common sense.”
Ads — and polling — suggest this is going to be an election about health care.
10. “But a lot of money has been passing to people to come up and try and get to the border by Election Day, because they think that’s a negative for us. Number one, they’re being stopped. And number two, regardless, that’s our issue.”
OK. So the President of the United States is suggesting money is being paid to people traveling in a caravan headed to try to gain entry into the United States for baldly political reasons — which, I think, he is suggesting are that it will make immigration an issue in the election and that Democrats think they win on that issue. I mean, I think? There’s a whole lot of logic jumps happening here.
11. “The one thing, they stick together, but they wanted that caravan and there are those that say that caravan didn’t just happen. It didn’t just happen. A lot of reasons that caravan, 4,000 people.”
Again, Trump signaling — with zero proof — that Democrats are somehow behind the caravan of immigrants moving toward the US.
14. “Do you ever see when the fake news interviews them? And then they try and cut it, but they — they’ll go to a person holding a sign who gets paid by Soros or somebody, right? That’s what happens.”
Another common Trump conspiracy theory: The news seeks out protesters — and these protesters are paid for by George Soros, the liberal billionaire. This is, um, not true.
15. “But did you see the signs? They’re brand-new. They’re beautiful, the black-and-white signs. Everybody has the same size, right from the finest printer in Washington. Do you think the people — those are not signs made in the basement. They were all identical.”
Trump can keep saying that the protests against Kavanuagh were not organic. But that doesn’t make it true.
16. “It’s a whole — hey, look, there’s a lot of rigged things going on in this country, you know about that. There are a lot of rigged things going on.”
These lines are at the heart of Trump’s appeal. The system is rigged against you, normal person, and only Trump will tell you the truth about it. And only Donald Trump will fight for you, the little guy, against these elites who think they are smarter and better than you.
voterepDem
17. “Obstruction. You know, I just walked in, and a big, strong guy grabbed me. And he was almost crying. It happens every time. And many times. And he said, sir, ‘Mr. President, thank you so much for saving our country.'”

Two thoughts here: a) How did Trump go from attacking the Mueller probe for looking into whether he obstructed the investigation to a big guy hugging him? b) Trump says that big, strong guys hug him and thank him for saving America outside every rally. Does this actually happen?

18. “He’s — he runs eight times. ‘Sir, I won five elections.’ I said, well, you got me there. I ran once, and I won one election, but it’s the presidency, right? That’s right.”
Always, always, always the obsessions with how he is better and special.
19. “That’s all the time we need to make America great again. Make America great again. Is that — is that maybe the greatest slogan in the history of runs?”
Many people are saying that. Believe me. Big time.
20. “It is incredible the deep state where they don’t even look at her. Isn’t it incredible?”
To be clear: This is the President of the United States openly alleging there is a group of people embedded within the federal bureaucracy who are operating a conspiracy to protect Hillary Clinton and to get him, somehow.
21. “But I like acid-washing, because that really says it. She acid-washes 33,000, so that nobody can ever find — but they’re around some place. I think that maybe — maybe they’re at the State Department.”
It is true that Clinton deleted roughly 50% (or 33,000) of the emails she sent from her private server as secretary of state. Those emails were determined, by a Clinton lawyer, to be personal — and with no professional relevance. As to the idea that the State Department has them, I have no idea what Trump is talking about. Remember that he asked the Russians to try to find those deleted emails during the summer of 2016.
22. “But maybe they’re at the State Department. They could very well be at the Department of Justice, if you can believe that whole deal. But we’re just being quiet. We’re being quiet. Do you know why? There’s been no collusion.”
WHAAAAAAA? So the deleted Clinton emails are either at State or Justice? What proof of this does Trump have? (He doesn’t have any.) Also, why is “collusion” mentioned here???
23. “If I ever called the Russians, the first one to know about it would be the state of Montana, and they wouldn’t be too happy. Can you imagine? Let’s call the Russians? It’s a disgrace.”
The allegation is not that Trump “called” the Russians to help with a state. Its that the Russians, believing that Trump would be a better president for them, ran a campaign of misinformation and interference to try to bring about that result. The intelligence community unanimously affirmed that happened. Trump has never been willing to accept it.
24. “And look at all the women for Trump signs. Here we go again. It’s the same thing. Everyone says, but will he get the women?”
Trump won 41% of women in the 2016 election, according to exit polling. His job approval among women is 28% in the October CNN-SSRS poll.
25. “Everybody else had cloth on their face, and I probably would have, also, cloth that was water, right, wet, on their face. She sat there, hey, what else is new? That’s the way she is.”
In which Trump touts his wife’s toughness because she didn’t put a cloth to her face when smoke entered the cabin of her plane due to a mechanical error. (Everybody was safe.) Remember that for Trump, toughness is everything.
26. “No, Mike is great. We have — we had such great people. We had such great people. And a lot of talented people. And the end result is this is where we are. And we’re doing a lot of good.”
Trump logic flow: Mike Huckabee → great people → talented people → we are where we are → doing a lot of good.
27. “And you walk around in those conditions, you can’t fake it. You can’t fake it. So that’s one good thing. Nobody ever says that any more. That’s one of the — might be one of the best things that’s happened to me in a long time.”
Trump here is touting the fact that people don’t ask whether he wears a toupee any more because he walks around areas devastated by natural disasters and there is a lot of wind blowing. Yes, seriously.
28. “Barbara Walters interviewed me. Do you mind if I play with your hair? Do you

remember that? And then numerous people have done that. But that’s OK. But the choice could not be more clear. Democrats produce mobs. Republicans produce jobs.”

He said these two thing back to back. There are no sentences I omitted. Barbara Walters on his hair to Democrats producing mobs.
29. “Well, it’s big sky. I guess there’s a reason for everything, right? No, it’s just — I got out and I’m looking — I’ve been here many times — but I got out and I’m looking — I say, that really is big sky.”
[looks around, wondering if anyone else is hearing this]
30. “Democrats have become the party of crime. It’s true.”
[narrator voice] It’s not.
31. “I said, I’m going to put that in. I’m going to say that when I make speeches. Nobody’s ever challenged it. Maybe they have. Who knows? I have to always say that, because then they’ll say they did actually challenge it, and they’ll put like — then they’ll say he gets a Pinocchio.”
This is some meta-Trump right here. He explains how he told his aides he was going to start calling Democrats the party of crime, then says no one has ever challenged that assertion, then says they actually have, then says he doesn’t care if it’s true or not.
32. “But Greg is smart. And by the way, never wrestle him. You understand that? Never. Any guy that can do a body slam, he’s my kind of … he was my guy.

Rep. Greg Gianforte pleaded guilty to assaulting a reporter who was asking him questions. HA HA HA HA. Wait, what the actual hell?

33. “But I’ve done so many campaign — I’m so far ahead. But — but we’ve started the wall. And it’s moving. And we’re going to get it, but get me some Republican votes, please.”
One order of world salad, please.
34. “He’s — now, it’s hard for a Republican to win in California, because it’s become, like, crazy. But all of a sudden are Republicans making big progress. It’s going to be very interesting to see what happens in that race.”
Trump is talking here about the California governor’s race. A Los Angeles Times poll that came out two days ago showed Democrat Gavin Newsom with a 23-point lead over Republican John Cox. So….
35. “Justice Kavanaugh, number one in his class at Yale”
Yale doesn’t have class rank.
36. “And in the case especially of Justice Kavanaugh, the lies that were made up, the stories that came out, and he didn’t — he honestly — I’m pretty good at this stuff — he honestly never heard of this stuff. He never heard of it. It was a big con job. You’ve heard me say that. It was a con job.”
Remember that Trump initially said that Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were both teenagers, deserved to be treated with respect and have her story told. Now, of course, he believes her to be part of some sort of secret Democratic plot to oust Kavanaugh. The evidence for this claim? There is none.
37. “Remember? Remember Jon Lovitz, the liar, remember Jon Lovitz? Yeah, yeah, I’m a businessman, that’s right. I went to — yeah, yeah, I went to Harvard. Yeah, that’s right. I went to Harvard. I’m a businessman. That was, like, a female version of Jon Lovitz.
I DO appreciate Trump’s reference to a 1980s “Saturday Night Live” sketch in which Lovitz played Tommy Flanagan aka the Pathological Liar. I’m not sure a man who has said more than 5,000 false or misleading claims in his first 601 days in office should be evoking a pathological liar.
38. “Remember, he challenged me to a fight, and that was fine. And when I said he wouldn’t last long, he’d be down faster than Greg would take him down.”
The President of the United States saying he would punch out the former vice president of the United State faster than a member of Congress assaulted a reporter. All totally normal stuff here!
39. “He’d be down so fast. Remember? Faster than Greg. I’d have to go very fast. I’d have to immediately connect.”
“I will be so presidential, you will be so bored.” — Donald Trump
40. “He’s a handsome, wonderful father.”
41. “A little bit like Justice Kavanaugh, you know, really a very fine, high-quality, handsome guy.”
Two descriptions of former White House physician Ronny Jackson in which Trump says he is “handsome.” This is yet more evidence of how much focus Trump puts on whether people look the part. He views hiring for his administration as casting — and you have to look good to make it on the Trump Show.
42. “I came up with the name Pocahontas, and they once said you must apologize for that. I said, why? Well, it’s not nice what you’re doing. I said, OK, I’d like to apologize to the real Pocahontas.”
Classic Trump. Deriding Elizabeth Warren by referring to her as a famous Native American woman isn’t his problem, it’s the problem of the political correctness police.
43. “By the way, they keep saying, will he do well with women? Remember last time? They said the same thing. We did — we did very well with women. I think I probably won because of women, I hate to tell you, men.”
He got 41% of women’s votes. So, he definitively did not win because of women.
44. “Do you know that we have the hottest economy, as big as we are? We were going down. We have the hottest economy on Earth. People are moving back in.”
Economy! So hot right now!
45. “Because we are American and our hearts bleed red, white, and blue. You know that.”

Part VI – Psychoanalysis of an Ex-Lover’s Major Life-Changing Event

May Day ’18

Bon Jovi sang it best, I did my part but she didn’t. I was ‘shot through the heart and you’re to blame, she gives LOVE a bad name.

Thus she gives LOVE a bad name.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=youtube+bon+jovi&view=detail&mid=D7A60F5841A20449CA90D7A60F5841A20449CA90&FORM=VIRE

Amazing that John Bon Jovi never met the “Church Lady of MPPC”

Defense Mechanisms

defense mech

 

Psychoanalysis of a Life Changing Event [for my ex-wif]

May Day 2018

No not for this author but for my ex- and only wif during my 64+ years.

The irony is I thought that Beatles song would mirror my own life (you know, … Vera, Chuck, and Dave) when I attained this age of mine despite using all kinds of recreational drugs (no H or smack) during my ‘formative years’ – when coincidently I met my wif during college days in the Big Ten Conference – and engaging for pay in some dangerous and unsafe activities (fyi, I became a safety engineer in 1979 – when coincidently I married my wife near Lake Michigan – we did not have issues until we arrived in the ‘land of milk and honey’ Northern California).

You would think I’d be mildly upset that my college honey decided to remarry an atheist, who lived next door between 1995 and 2007 – when coincidently I moved to Sonoma County wine country, alone.

Naw she could not understand how elated I was that she would be able to retire next week and not have to work in a preschool daycare center until she aged to 80 or so. My vows specifically stated ‘until death do y’all part’ and I had still felt responsibility for her health insurance premiums, mortgage payments, property taxes, raising our daughter, and the re-sale value on a $2 to $3,000,000.00 house in beautiful County of San Mateo.

Fortunately, the divorce proceedings she handled her self and but I hired a lawyer only to be shafted after we’d been separated for a year or so.

What I thought was my second love of my life, was lost because Susan was so honorable that we refrained from ‘hanky panky’ until my first divorce was finalized. The time was not right for us and I suffered a broken heart.

iinmate-commits-suicide-in-jail

Today, I am thinking that I would not have incurred a broken heart if my ex-wif did not drag her feet meddling with the legal paperwork and dirty-dealing with my lawyer and the divorce court judge in his chambers, no less. Dear Susan and I could not wait… I recall breaking up on the Fourth of July, no less.

Like a cat falling, I always have tried to land on my feet after losing a relationship or changing jobs.

Death is a subject which I have researched. Taking a lesson from Kubler-Ross, I should be angry, then go through denial, and now begin to cry. So I am trying to cry today so my subconscious can, as my Mom would say, “David, get over it.”

I should just write it off that my ex-wif decided on “a marriage of convenience.”

Excuse me, I am going to take a nap.

Index of the Seven Essays in this Series

Psychoanalysis of DBD’s Life-Changing Event in 2018

Part One

https://maxsscoutservicesllc.wordpress.com/2018/05/11/psychoanalysis-of-a-life-changing-event-for-my-ex-wif/

 

Part 2

https://wordpress.com/post/hootervilleranchindiana.wordpress.com/734

 

Part III

https://wordpress.com/post/daileysun.wordpress.com/349

 

Part IV

https://wordpress.com/post/backhomeinindianawithferg.wordpress.com/192

 

Part V

https://wordpress.com/post/hootervilleranchindiana.wordpress.com/740

 

Part VI

https://maxsscoutservicesllc.wordpress.com/2018/05/22/part-vi-psychoanalysis-of-an-ex-lovers-major-life-changing-event/

 

Part VII

https://backhomeinindianawithferg.wordpress.com/2018/05/24/seventh-part-a-psychoanalytic-retrospective-of-an-ex-lover/

 

 

copyright 2018

Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas

[ for musement only ]

Resilience ( by Mark Taylor thee Canberry Psychologists)

via There’s no one way to describe what resilience looks like and no-one is resilient all of the time. Below are some characteristics that we might expect to see in a student who is coping well or is resilient.resilience

Just a Thought: A Reflection on Republican History – Avoiding a Constitutional Crisis, Preserving the Republic, and Fostering World Peace

Could the Republican Party do the U.S. and the world a favor?

May we take a lesson from history?

It was done during the 1970’s.

In the name of the party of Abraham Lincoln and by the grace of God, can it happen again?

(1) The Speaker of the House of Representatives changed prior to the mid-term election of 1974, with a presidential election looming in 1976.

(2) The dishonorable Vice President (Spiro Agnew / like Mike Pence) was replaced.

(3) The sitting President (RMN) resigned with some dignity and many accomplishments.

(4) The Vice President (Gerald Ford) seamlessly assumed the Presidency.

(5) A respectable Vice President (former New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller) was selected.

(6) The U. S. House of Representatives democratically elected a new Speaker of the House (who follows the VP as next in-line to succeed the President of the United States of America (POTUS)).

Given the Trade War, military conflicts, resignation of today’s Speaker, and recent alliance of Russia – China – Syria, perhaps Americans should pursue the best options.

So help US God.

Go Indy Colts !

copyright MMXVIII

~ Max’s Scout Services & Communications of the Americas, LLC ~

[ not necessarily for musement only ]